Monthly Archives: March 2018

Which Continent Will Lead the $20 Billion Drone Market in 2018?

By | Drones | No Comments

A new drone market research report by Research and Markets makes the largest and boldest prediction yet for the drone industry, which the report predicts will exceed $50 billion in the next 7 years.  North America is expected to  lead the market this year, largely due to increased defence expenditures of the US and Canada and the presence of major UAV manufacturers in North America.  The European and Latin American regions are expected to be the new revenue-generating markets for unmanned aerial vehicles,” says the report.

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Why UK Near-Miss Statistics Don’t Tell The Whole Story

By | Drones, legislation | No Comments

Not as catchy as the recent headline of the Press Association analysis of data from the UK Airport Board, the body responsible for collating and assessing near miss incidents between aircraft in UK airspace.

The headline, understandably, is that reports of near misses between drones and manned aircraft have tripled in the last three years,  which is very worrying but this article from Dronelife looks at the numbers in more depth and concludes with the UK Government’s Drone Bill expected in the coming weeks, realism is required more than ever.

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This drone has an origami arm that unfolds to pick up objects

By | Drones | No Comments

“Folding, packaging of everyday things are everywhere,”….“Why not for robots?”
Scientists have created a foldable robotic arm that allows drones to pick up objects inside narrow ditches.The arm, described in a study published today in Science Robotics, is made of seven plastic actuators that look like rectangular boxes stacked up on top of each other and stretching up to 27.5 inches (70 centimeters) in length. But what’s special about the actuators is that they can be folded flat, so that the arm is stowed away. Scientists attached the arm to a drone. When equipped with finger-like grippers, the arm could grab an object at the bottom of a ditch. When equipped with a camera, it could take video among tree branches.

In the future, this robotic arm could help scientists collect samples from crevices or inspect chimneys, pipes, and other narrow spaces

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